Eduardo Contreras
Eduardo Contreras
John Dinges
John Dinges
Mónica González
Mónica González
Carmen Hertz
Carmen Hertz
Peter Kornbluh
Peter Kornbluh
Patricia Verdugo
Patricia Verdugo

Protagonists

Please go to the Resources page to see a list of writings by the film’s protagonists and others.

EDUARDO CONTRERAS

Eduardo Contreras is an attorney, journalist, professor, and writer who, since 1963, has specialized in criminal and labor law. He is married and has one child. He served as a mayor and congressman during the Allende government and was exiled to Panama, Cuba and Mexico after the 1973 military coup. In 1998 he was the plaintiff’s attorney in the first criminal complaint filed against Augusto Pinochet in Chile.

JOHN DINGES

John Dinges is a former foreign correspondent and author of three books on major events involving the United States and Latin America. He was a special correspondent in Chile and Central America for the Washington Post, where he also worked as a foreign desk editor. He served as deputy foreign editor and managing editor of National Public Radio News. Mr. Dinges is the recipient of many awards, including the Maria Moors Cabot Prize for excellence in Latin American reporting. He is currently Godfrey Lowell Cabot Professor of International Journalism, Columbia University, and executive director of the Center for Investigation and Information (CIINFO), a nonprofit corporation to organize investigative journalism initiatives in Latin America. He is also founder and former director of the Centro de Investigación e Información Periodistica (CIPER), Santiago, Chile (a CIINFO-funded project).

www.johndinges.com

Mónica González

Mónica González is director of the Centro de Investigación e Información Periodistica (CIPER) in Santiago, Chile, and international correspondent for Clarín (Buenos Aires).

In a long career as one of Chile’s leading journalists, she has written for many publications, including La Nación and El Siglo. She was also a founder and editor of Siete +7 magazine and Diario Siete.

During the Allende government, Ms. González worked for Editorial Quimantu and reported for El Siglo. She was exiled to France after the 1973 coup and returned to Chile in 1978. Since then she has reported for a wide range of newspapers and magazines and written many prize-winning articles and books about Chile.

Among other honors, she has won the Louis M. Lyons Award for Conscience and Integrity in Journalism, Harvard University (1987), and the María Moors Cabot Award, Columbia University (2001).

www.ciperchile.cl

CARMEN HERTZ

Carmen Hertz is a Chilean human rights attorney and widow of journalist Carlos Berger Guralnik, who was killed October 19th, 1973, in the military operation called “The Caravan of Death.” After the murder, Carmen fled the country with her 11-month-old son. In 1977 she returned to Chile and worked until 1992 at the Vicarariate of Solidarity, which led the defense of human rights in Chile during the dictatorship. She represented plaintiffs in the Caravan of Death case against Augusto Pinochet and helped achieve the lifting of the former dictator’s parliamentary immunity from prosecution.

Since the return of democratic government to Chile, Hertz has held numerous high positions in government. She was Chile’s Ambassador to Hungary and Bosnia-Herzogovina from 2006 to March 2009 and is now Director of Human Rights in the Ministry of Foreign Relations. She has received numerous awards, including the Dr. Jean Mayer Global Citizenship Award from Tufts University, Boston.

PETER KORNBLUH

Peter Kornbluh directs the Cuba and Chile Documentation Projects at the National Security Archive in Washington, D.C. From 1990-1999, he taught at Columbia University as an adjunct assistant professor of international and public affairs. He is the author/editor/co-editor of a number of Archive books, including The Pinochet File: A Declassified Dossier on Atrocity and Accountability, which the Los Angeles Times selected as a “best book” of the year. His articles have been published in Foreign Policy, the New York Review of Books, and the New Yorker, among other places. In 2005/2006, Mr. Kornbluh wrote a weekly column for the Chilean newspaper, Diario Siete. He has worked on, and appeared in, numerous documentary films, including the Oscar winning Panama Deception and the History Channel’s Bay of Pigs Declassified.

PATRICIA VERDUGO

Chilean writer and journalist Patricia Verdugo, who died of cancer in 2008, devoted her career to uncovering the corruption and human rights abuses of the regime of General Augusto Pinochet. She graduated in 1968 from the Catholic University of Chile, worked for the centrist magazine Ercilla, and helped found Hoy (1977). She risked her life documenting the disappearance of political prisoners and other crimes in many books, which are listed on the “Resources” page of this web site. Her many awards include the prestigious Maria Moors Cabot Prize for excellence in Latin American reporting (1993) and Chile’s Journalism Award (1997), the nation’s most prestigious journalism award.